January 18, 2022

The World Live Breaking News Coverage & Updates IN ENGLISH

The World Live Breaking News Coverage & Updates IN ENGLISH

A Schooling Debate: In Person or Remote?

2 min read
, A Schooling Debate: In Person or Remote?, The World Live Breaking News Coverage & Updates IN ENGLISH
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, A Schooling Debate: In Person or Remote?, The World Live Breaking News Coverage & Updates IN ENGLISH
, A Schooling Debate: In Person or Remote?, The World Live Breaking News Coverage & Updates IN ENGLISH

John Abeigon, the Newark Teachers Union president, is quoted as saying, “I’d see the entire city of Newark unemployed before I allowed one single teacher’s aide to die needlessly.” It’s this kind of burn-the-village-to-save-it extremism that will see the Democrats trounced in the midterm elections.

Michael Dougherty
Roxborough, Colo.

To the Editor:

We are told that the safest place for children is in school. But we can’t ignore the issue of how they and their teachers get to school. Many are traveling on crowded buses and subways and may get infected with Covid well before they get into the classroom.

Ruth Albert Spencer
New York

To the Editor:

Parents across the country are facing impossible choices, between sending their kids to school with a highly contagious variant raging and testing protocols not fully rolled out, and keeping them home without good alternative learning options and employers increasingly weary of pandemic disruptions.

You write that some “unions’ demands echo the ones they have made for nearly two years,” despite “the reassuring knowledge that in-school transmission of the virus has been limited.”

As you point out, however, several nonunion charter networks switched to temporary remote learning in recent weeks, while in most unionized public schools, no such option existed.

Education, like health care, faces worrisome staff shortages. I wish the current debate would focus more on finding common-ground solutions that meet the uncertainty of the moment, including temporary remote options that could ease crowding in schools and hospitals, and less on blaming the people who dedicate their lives to educating and safeguarding our kids.

Eva Bonime
New York

To the Editor:

OK, I understand the concern of schools and teachers, but study after study has shown that we have not gotten remote learning right and our students are falling further and further behind. This is particularly true of the poor, who tend not to have jobs that allow work from home for the parents. If more schools now turn to remote learning, what are they supposed to do?

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