October 20, 2021

The World Live Breaking News Coverage & Updates IN ENGLISH

The World Live Breaking News Coverage & Updates IN ENGLISH

For drug busts in tech age, police still rely on ‘khabris’

2 min read
For drug busts in tech age, police still rely on ‘khabris’
Share This :
For drug busts in tech age, police still rely on ‘khabris’
For drug busts in tech age, police still rely on ‘khabris’

MUMBAI: Hardik (name changed) reads the morning papers at his home in Mumbai’s Bhuleshwar while his wife cooks a meal. He then drops his sons at school before heading off to meet someone. Hardik has some big news to share. Later that day, a police team raids an establishment in Mumbai and recovers a stash of drugs.
Hardik checks the newspapers again the following day and pores over a news story about the drug bust. This time, he can afford the vacation his family has been asking for. The reward for the drug tip-off should be sizable.
The influence of the ‘khabri’ network may have waned with the advent of technology, but for drug busts, drug enforcement agencies still rely on human intelligence. “Technology can support and increase accuracy of human intel but cannot replace it,” says DCP Datta Nalawade of Mumbai’s anti-narcotics cell. Typically, anti-drugs law enforcement agencies verify information before carrying out a raid. Often, a confidential informant can help verify the information on ground. “Mumbai has a large number of individuals who make a living out of supplying information to agencies full-time,” said Nalawade.
Many informants live on the fringes of the criminal world. “That is how they gain authentic information,” said a former IPS officer. A good reward is usually the motivation to snitch. The police have a secret fund while national agencies could offer a percentage depending on the recovery. “At times, a tip-off comes from someone in the drug supply chain who is disgruntled, offended or humiliated,” he said..
“We look for a weak link in the supply chain and use certain strategies to get details, or we introduce one of our trusted informants into the network,” said a official.
A retired officer recalled how drug informants were developed a decade ago. “One of my informants was anxious as his wife was in a road crash and needed blood. I agreed to donate it. I would remind him thereafter that we now had a ‘bond of blood’ and he should deliver when I needed him to,” he recalls.
For informants, a good reward is usually the motivation to snitch. The police have a secret fund while national agencies could offer a percentage depending on the recovery of drugs.

Share This :
Copyright © All rights reserved. | Newsphere by AF themes.